Knitting Business Success Story – Jill and Susan from Y2Knit

Susan and Jill have brought together their love of knitting and yarn, their skills, life passions and experiences to create www.Y2Knit.net, a knitting business with a difference!

They are a wonderful example of the many paths that a life in knitting can take you down, and how being creative with your approach can set you apart and make your knitting business a success.

Both Susan and Jill have been knitting since they were young children, and both have been teaching knitting for many years now. Their knitting business, Y2Knit, has evolved over the last few years to include not only the yarn store, but also knitting workshops (online and live), an extensive pattern collection, two published knitting books, two more books on the way, and of course their famous knitting retreats!

“Jill and I both loved the idea of combining a relaxing experience with knitting workshops, good food, yoga, massage and fun conversation. Our most recent knitting getaway was in Tuscany” says Susan.

This is a great example of finding a niche and doing something that really sets you apart.

Both Susan and Jill attribute their success to determination and hard work, as well as flexibility and being able to capitalise on each others skills. “We tend to have different strengths, so we can balance each other, and we are also able to bounce ideas off one another” says Jill.

They both had some experience in business when they started out, and now have a knitting business plan which helps keep them moving in the direction they want to go. “We are constantly looking at how we can excel and succeed in our knitting business” says Susan.

And they have some great advice for anyone wanting to start teaching knitting:

“I think the first step is to identify if you are a good teacher. Try teaching your friends and see what it’s like. If you find that you can’t stifle your impatience, then teaching knitting isn’t for you!

Jill and I both love to teach knitting, and I think that our enthusiasm shows through. To start, develop some lesson plans, find a venue, and work at getting people to sign up. To be an entrepreneur, you must be able to do your own marketing.”

They freely admit that their hours are long, and it can be challenging to embrace the rapid changes that have occurred in this industry over the last few years, but both Jill and Susan show a wonderful passion for knitting and teaching knitting, and live life surrounded by the people and things that are most enjoyable for them, a dream come true for many of us!

If you have found Jill and Susan’s story helpful and inspirational, or would like to know more about how to start teaching knitting, please leave a comment!

Comments

  1. Jeanette Cameron says:

    I found your blog very interesting.

    For a number of years I have thought about approaching a local primary school to offer my time to teach knitting. I feel this could benefit the children who are not academically inclined. It would be fun, would help with dexterity, concentration and at a later stage reading skills and numeracy.

    What do you think?

  2. Thanks for your comment Jeanette. I think your idea is wonderful – at about 7 or 8 years old most children will have the dexterity to be able to learn to knit, and you could even start them off with something really easy like spool knitting so they feel proud and encouraged when their first project is a success. It’s definitely worth approaching the school and asking, and even if it doesn’t work out during school hours, you could run an after-school class and promote it using the benefits you have mentioned above – I would sign my kids up for that – anybody else? Let us all know how you go!

  3. Hi.  I am a knitter who has stumbled upon someone who wants to learn how to knit.  She is willing to pay me for lessons, so we are starting this coming Saturday.  I have never done this before, but I am excited and feel good about it.  Any advice?  I am planning to try to attract others who are interested in lessons.
    Cheers,
    Karen